Banner – Isuzu Truck
 BUYERS GUIDE
DON'T BUY A EUROPEAN SOFTROADER - January 2016
We won't test them any more and here's why you shouldn't buy one.

Nearly all European soft-roaders now come with temporary spare wheels, run-flat tyres or no spare and a can of tyre inflation gas and sealant. In Australia, that's dangerous we believe.

m-b gl-a 250There is simply no place for soft-roaders with temporary spares, run-flat tyres or the spare-less vehicle with a can of sealant and a supposed tyre inflation gas charge.

None of these 'solutions' to the spare tyre problem works in the Australian environment.

We've tested temporary spares, run-flats and gas cans and none of them can be relied upon in the Australian-distance context - not even on freeways and major highways.

 

It's a great shame, because there are some wonderful European machines in the marketplace.

A shining example is the 2015 Mercedes-Benz GL-A 250 SUV. This vehicle is beautifully made, goes very well, handles like a sports car, bristles with all the expected electronic gadgetry and would make an ideal easy-trail and gravel-road touring machine - except that it rolls on run-flat tyres.

Lift the cargo floor and you discover a shallow spare wheel well that is fitted with a jack (why?) and a Harmon Kardon stereo amplifier, but no spare wheel and tyre.

Like all 'solutions' to the issue of having to carry and change a flat tyre, run-flats have inadequate driving range to allow safe transport to a tyre centre. Also, the chance of that rural centre having a replacement tyre is zero, necessitating at least a 24-hour stay until a tyre can be flown in. Read about our run-flat experience.

We had the new 'Benz for a week's test, but it spent all its time on the bitumen and we had to ensure we were never more than 80 kilometres from a Mercedes-Benz dealer, just in case we scored a flat. How bloody stupid is that?

Fortunately, there are plenty of spare-wheel-equipped Japanese and Korean SUVs for us to evaluate.



« Go Back

Banner – Isuzu Truck