BUYERS GUIDE
TOYOTA PRADO - Updated November 2015
The Prado received a much need powetrain upgrade for 2016.

The post-2010 Prado range had 14 variants, with the choice of three and five door body styles, petrol and diesel engines, six-speed manual and five-speed auto transmissions and six model grades. Upgraded diesel and petrol engines were installed in September 2015, with a six-speed automatic option.

toyota prado 2016For 2016 Toyota gave the Prado a new-generation turbo-diesel engine, an improved petrol V6 and new six-speed automatic transmission.

The new Euro 5 compliant 2.8-litre four-cylinder engine is the same basic engine as the one fitted to the 2016 HiLux. It’s smaller than the engine it replaces, yet produces 130kW and up to 450Nm of torque.

For the Prado this engine has been fitted with an additional balance shaft, to damp out four-cylinder vibrations. Will that be enough to compete with the Jeep Grand Cherokee’s silky smooth European V6 diesel and the other Euro V6 diesels?  Time will tell.

Prado's V6 petrol engine has been upgraded to produce a further 5kW of power while also lowering emissions to Euro 5 levels.

The two engines can be mated to a six-speed, intelligent automatic transmission. A six-speed manual gearbox is standard with the diesel engine on GX and GXL models.

Other Prado upgrades include satellite navigation in the volume-selling GXL variant – about time - and the range-topping Kakadu gains rear cross-traffic alert, which is designed to warn of approaching traffic when reversing from a parking space.

The model line-up remains the same: diesel-only GX is available with five or seven seats and seven-seat GXL, VX and Kakadu have a choice of engines. The two higher grades are auto only.

The updated Prado range starts at $52,990 for the five-seat GX manual diesel and the automatic transmission model is $2000 more. GX seven-seaters are $55,490 and $57,490.

The popular GXL is $59,990 for a diesel manual, $60,990 for a petrol auto and $61,990 for a diesel auto.

The VX is $72,990 for a petrol and $73,990 for a diesel. Those with plenty of money can shell out $83,490 or $84,490 for a Kakadu.

What you get

toyota prado 2016The GX manual scores: five seats on GX (seven-seat option); seven airbags; display audio and rear-view camera; trailer sway control; emergency brake signal; vehicle stability control;  Active traction control (A-TRC); ABS with electronic brake-force distribution (EBD) and brake assist (BA); air-conditioning; cruise control; smart entry and button start; tlt and telescopic steering column adjustment; 220-volt rear accessory socket; Bluetooth; SB and iPod auxiliary input; audio and phone controls on the steering wheel; side mirror-mounted indicators; aluminium wheels; maximum 2500kg towing capacity.

The auto model adds: Hill-Start Assist Control (HAC) and Downhill Assist Control (DAC).

Prado GXL gets: seven seats standard; satellite navigation; nine speakers; climate-control three-zone air conditioning; rear parking sensors; front fog lamps; roof rails; side steps; premium wheel, shift lever knob and handbrake lever; cargo cover; sun visor extensions; privacy glass and heated and power-retractable exterior mirrors.

The VX picks up:electronically modulated Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System (KDSS) suspension; 18-inch wheels; automatic on/off LED headlamps and washers; rain-sensing wipers; leather-accented seats; heated front and second-row seats; power steering column adjustment; power-folding third-row seat; front parking sensors; 17-speaker premium JBL audio;  DAB+ digital radio; auto headlights; self-dipping interior mirror; luggage utility rails and a full-colour multi-information display with steering wheel switch.

The Kakadu boasts: rear cross traffic alert; blind spot monitor; pre-crash safety system; radar cruise control with steering wheel-mounted controls; Blu-ray rear-seat entertainment system; five-mode CRAWL control; four-camera Multi-Terrain Monitor; electronic rear differential lock; Adaptive Variable Suspension; height-adjustable and auto-levelling rear air suspension; Multi-Terrain Select (MTS) traction-control switch; moonroof; refrigerated cool box; key-linked driver's seat and steering column two-position memory pack.

 

On and off road

We didn't get to the press launch, but we did evaluate two press vehicles: the top-shelf Kakadu and the popular GXL. Both were diesels, but the Kakadu had the new six-speed auto and the GXL was a six-speed manual model.

The Kakadu lacked nothing in the way of 'fruit' and electronic gadgetry, but we couldn't see the value in the extra spend. Its KDSS and adjustable suspension didn't give it much handling advantage over the GXL and a set of decent monotube dampers in the GXL would redress any difference, we think.

Off road the Kakadu's Crawl, rear-axle diff lock and adjustable-height rear air suspension gave it an edge over the GXL, but many GXL buyers will fit after-market traction kit anyway.

Both Prados were quiet on road and four-cylinder engine harshness didn't intrude unless revs went over the 3000rpm mark. The Kakadu's auto was happy to cruise below 2000rpm at 110km/h, but the GXL's manual had its engine spinning at 2400rpm at highway cruise.

Both vehicles averaged 9.7L/100km on our test.

Cargo capacity is compromised by the seven-seat layout and market-leading 150-litre fuel capacity, but few bush travellers will complain. Payload capacity is around 750kg and towing capacity is a sensible 2500kg.

The Prado has enjoyed top spot in the 4WD wagon market for several years and the 2016 models probably have the goods to keep things that way. The Prado is now edging away from its traditional medium-priced segment and will doubtless lose some sales to the new HiLux-based Fortuner. On the plus side, the more powerful engine and six-speed boxes will help it grab some share from the 200 Series.

Check out our video test:

 

 

 

toyota prado

 

Post 2010 models

The 2010 engine choices were 4.0-litre, 202kW/381Nm dual VVT-i petrol and 3.0-litre, 127kW/410Nm turbocharged common-rail direct-injection diesel.

Both engines could be matched to six-speed manual or five-speed sequential-shift automatic transmissions.

Standard equipment on all Prados included seven airbags, Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), All-terrain Traction Control (A-TRC), ABS with Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) and Brake Assist (BA), air-conditioning, cruise control, smart entry and smart start, tilt and telescopic steering column adjustment, 220-volt rear accessory socket, Bluetooth TM mobile telephone capability, USB auxiliary input and iPod ® control, side-mirror-mounted indicators, aluminium wheels, conversation mirror, UV-cut glass, ventilated coolbox in the centre console and a minimum 2500kg towing capacity (three door Prados are rated for 3000kg).

Automatic GX had the added feature of Hill-Start Assist Control (HAC) and Downhill Assist Control (DAC), while an option pack added third-row seats and extended the side-curtain SRS airbags to the third row.

Prado GXL grade had the added features over GX of standard-fitment third-row seats and a third-row side curtain-shield airbag, climate-control three-zone air conditioning, rear-view camera, rear parking sensors, 4.2-inch multi-information display, wider alloy wheels and tyres, steering wheel audio controls, alarm system, front fog lamps, roof rails, side steps, premium steering wheel, shift lever knob and handbrake lever, roller-blind-type tonneau cover, sun visor extensions, FM diversity antenna and two additional cup holders.

VX grade had the additional features over GXL of new electronically modulated KDSS suspension, 18-inch aluminium wheels, automatic on/off HID projector headlamps with steering-linked Adaptive Front-light System (AFS) and headlamp jet washers, rain-sensing intermittent wipers, leather-accented seat and door trim, heated front seats, power adjustment for the tilt and telescopic steering column, power-folding third-row seat, front parking sensors, nine-speaker audio with CD multi-changer, privacy glass, time-delay auto-cut headlights, electro-chromatic interior mirror, illuminated entry system, illuminated step and step cover, chrome interior door handles, luggage utility rails and multi-information display with steering wheel switch.

Top-of-the-range Kakadu grade added CRAWL control, four-camera Multi-Terrain Monitor (MTM), electronic rear differential lock, Toyota Adaptive Variable Suspension (AVS), height-adjustable and auto-levelling rear air suspension, Multi-Terrain Select (MTS) traction-control switch, moonroof, touch-screen satellite navigation, 14-speaker premium Pioneer audio system with DVD multi-changer, rear-seat entertainment, refrigerated cool-box, leather-accented and wood-look steering wheel, wood and metal-look instrument panel, and key-linked driver's seat and steering column memory pack. In addition, Kakadu had a rear-seat entertainment system with three wireless headphones, two headphone jacks and AV input.


Kakadu also had the advanced safety-pack combined option of Pre-Crash safety System (PCS) and radar cruise control, with steering wheel-mounted controls. Vehicles with the Kakadu safety option pack did not have CRAWL control, electronic locking rear differential, MTS and one of the MTM cameras.

The MY 2014  exterior changes included a deeper front bumper, heritage-inspired grille and newly styled wheels.

Interior changes included new multi-media audio systems, a redesigned dashboard and new materials, detailing and features.

Refinements were made to the standard suspension and the electronically modulated Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System.

Improved safety features included trailer sway control, a system that assists the driver if a towed vehicle is unsettled by factors such as crosswinds or bumpy roads.

A rear-view camera and stability and traction control were standard across the range, as was an emergency brake signal that automatically flashed the stop lights to warn other drivers of potential danger.

Despite the advances in styling and features, the entry price for Prado was kept at $55,990 and the changes across the rest of the range averaged less than 1.2 per cent.

The forward-folding angle of the second-row seats was increased by more than 12 degrees, improving ease of entry and exit for third-row occupants. VX and Kakadu's second-row outboard seats could be heated independently.

The revised driver's instrument binnacle incorporated new tachometer and speedometer dials - Optitron for VX and Kakadu. Between the Optitron dials was a new 4.2-inch colour TFT multi-information display (MID) that provided significantly enhanced off-road driving assistance.

Information regarding individual wheel traction control, steering angle and differential lock operation could be displayed simultaneously for maximum driver assistance in challenging terrain.


On top-level Kakadu, Multi-Terrain Select - which gave drivers suitable guidance while automatically controlling power output and braking inputs - was operated by a dial. A fifth mode, to help negotiate rocks and dirt, was added to the previous rock, loose rock, mud and sand, and moguls modes.

prado altitudeIn August 2014 Toyota introduced a Prado model with the spare tyre located out of sight under the vehicle rather than fitted to the rear door. Keeping supermarket shoppers happy was a glass hatch in the tailgate that allowed access to the cargo area without opening the door.

However, the Prado Altitude wasn't a bargain-basement offering, coming with a RRP of $68,520. It was based on the GXL three-litre turbo diesel with auto box and featured seven airbags, vehicle stability and traction control, anti-skid brakes, hill-start assist control and downhill assist control, reversing camera, rear parking sensors, three-zone climate-controlled air-conditioning, audio controls on the steering wheel, remote entry and start and cruise control.

The Altitude upgrade incorporated a 14-speaker JBL audio system, DAB+ digital radio, a seven-inch display screen and satellite navigation.

 

Chrome side mouldings, door handles and air-conditioning surrounds distinguished the Prado Altitude, along with carbon-fibre-look details on the dash panel and gearshift surround. The model wore an Altitude badge and four premium paints - Eclipse Black, Crystal Pearl, Silver Pearl and Graphite - were offered.

The loss was the Prado's second fuel tank, leaving total capacity at 87 litres - fine for suburbs and main roads, but not so good in the bush.

 

On and off road in 2010 models

The Prado’s aged four-cylinder turbo-diesel was pretty much past its use-by date, even with the more efficient positioning of the intercooler in front of the radiator rather than on top of the engine.

It felt overworked and fuel consumption on test was a disappointing 11L/100km when running solo and around 15L/100km when towing a 1500kg trailer.

Seat comfort was fine on a 2000km round trip over varying road surfaces and noise levels were commendably low.

Vision through the screen and large mirrors was excellent and the rear vision camera was a boon when reversing solo and when coupling.

We found all the controls intuitive to operate and the sound system provided good quality reproduction.

The additional gear on the very expensive Kakadu version isn’t worth it for most buyers. Much of the electronic wizardry is a copy of the system introduced by Land Rover in the Discovery 3, but the control switches for the suspension and traction variations are spread around the dashboard and on the steering wheel, so familiarisation takes quite some time.

On road, the variable damper settings had a noticeable effect on ride quality, but the air-suspended rear end is, sadly, no better than its Grande predecessor’s. The back end bottomed out easily on sharp bumps and lacked the suppleness of the cheaper SX’s coil springs. It did, however, keep ride height constant when a modest trailer was connected, but heavy ball loads caused the air spring pressures to rise, affecting ride quality.

The CRAWL function was a boon in difficult off-road conditions and the camera view of the track in front of the vehicle was useful when cresting sharp rises, but we’re not sure what happens to the camera view when a ‘roo bar is fitted.

 

Previous Models

The Toyota Prado has been with us since 1996 and has two body changes: one in 2003 and the most recent in 2009.

The Prado that was launched in Australia in 1996 had already been on sale in other markets in three-door and five-door guises since 1993.

The 90-series was launched here as a five-door, with independent semi-strut front suspension, coil-sprung live rear axle, full-time 4WD and a choice of two petrol engines.

The eight-seat (third row strictly for small children) Prado V6 came in four grades: RV, GXL, VX and Grande. Initial engines were petrol only: a 2.7-litre, four-cylinder 3RZ-FE and a 3.4 litre, V6 5VZ-FE. Although HiLux diesels were offered in overseas market Prados the Australian market was deemed to require more performance than was then available.

In August 1999 Prado V6 models were upgraded, with split-folding, 40:60 second-row seats with three head restraints, three child restraint anchorage points and a 40mm increase in cushion length.

Prado V6 RV and GXL retianed a vertical black grille, while the VX and Grande models had a horizontal-bar, chrome grille. Prado GXL, VX and Grande had front fog lamps as standard equipment.

The luxury grade VX and Grande's additional features were six-speaker audio, increased use of wood grain look and illuminated vanity mirrors.

 In March 2000 Toyota finally announced a three-litre, turbocharged and intercooled, 1KZ-TE diesel engine option in the Prado range, with 96kW of power at 3600rpm and 343Nm of torque at 2000rpm.

The three equipment grades were RV, GXL and TX, which was exclusively turbo-diesel.

In October 2000 a turbo-diesel automatic driveline was released.

Prado Turbo-diesel TX and Grande automatic models had the active safety features of vehicle stability control (VSC) and four-wheel-drive traction control (4WD-TRAC).

The 120-series Prado was launched in February 2003 as the successor to the market-leading model and racked up even more market share. Fuel tank capacity was a class leading 180 litres. The 2003 Prado was larger than its predecessor, but preserved its general mechanical layout – particularly in the case of the turbo-diesel models.

All models had SRS airbags and pre-tensioner front seat belts, eight seats with lap/sash belts and head restraints, but the front seats of GX and GXL models lacked seat height and lumbar adjustment.

Toyota made Prado customers spend more than seventy grand to get seats with height and lumbar adjustment. In 2004 Toyota added a six-speed manual and five-speed auto to the Prado range, but only behind the four-litre V6 petrol engine.

The diesels retained the existing five-speed manual and four-speed automatic transmissions until late 2006.

 

An anomaly was that the 2005 HiLux had a more advanced common rail diesel than the Prado, which had to make do with the older indirect-injection engine until late 2006. Also in 2004 Toyota released a new VX-grade, with V6 or turbo-diesel powertrains, between the GXL and Grande equipment grades.

Prado VX had an electronically controlled automatic transmission, front-seat mounted side airbags, front and second-row curtain airbags, Driver Assist Technology, including hill-start assist control, active traction control (TRC), vehicle stability control (VSC) and downhill assist control (DAC).


Comfort items above GXL grade included dual front zone climate control air conditioning, clean air filter and a rear cooler. Prado VX also had electrically adjustable driver’s seat lumbar support, driver’s seat vertical height adjustment, adjustable front head restraints and telescopic steering column adjustment. In addition, Prado VX had suede-look seat and door trim, wood grain-look dashboard features and door trim, roof rails, privacy glass and illuminated driver and passenger vanity mirrors with covers.

In November 2006 the HiLux’s three-litre, common-rail, 1KD-FTV direct-injection engine finally found its way into the Prado, delivering 127kW at 3400rpm (up from 96kW at 3600rpm) with peak torque of 410Nm at 1600-2800rpm (up from 343Nm at 2000rpm). Transmissions available with the new engine gained an extra ratio - a six-speed manual and an electronically controlled five-speed automatic with gated shift.

In September 2007 Toyota added a new standard-grade turbo-diesel manual or automatic transmission model to the Prado line-up and a leather-covered steering wheel with audio controls became standard across all five Prado grades.

Two option packs were available for the standard-grade model: the first one offering ABS anti-skid brakes, cruise control and a leather gearshift lever; and the second option pack for the auto model included Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Traction Control (TRC), climate control air conditioning and an exterior chrome package.
The 2007 Prado Grande was now fitted with a rear view camera.
That’s pretty much how the Prado remained until late 2009, when the re-skinned, current-shape 150-series was released.

Mechanical Issues

Early Prados suffered from front end troubles - recalls were issued – and weak automatic transmissions that hated heavy towing.

Most owners haven’t used the twin fuel tanks, so check that the transfer system works and that there’s no sludge in the reserve tank.

Inner mudguard panels suffer from cracking caused by chassis flex (cured in the 2010 Prado, which had stiffening members in the chassis) – particularly in the case of hard-worked examples and those fitted with an under-bonnet second battery.

 

Bush Modifications

The Prado drove through a constant 4WD system, with a manually lockable centre differential. The only traction aid in the most popular GXL model was a rear axle limited slip diff centre. Top-shelf models came with traction control, which worked very effectively.

The Prado’s engine bay was well laid out, with a pre-drilled space for a second battery box and a fuel filter that was easily reached. The air intake was in the RHS mudguard space and was well protected from splashes, provided the inner mudguard fitment was intact. This plastic infill was often disturbed when front bars were fitted.

The intercooler was fed air through a double-skinned bonnet, doing away with the need for a bonnet air scoop. The Prado was basically well specified for serious bush work, given that it came with up to 180 litres of fuel capacity, had traditional chassis plus body construction, a long-travel, live rear axle and legendary bush dealer support.

The starting point for a bush-capable Prado would be a GXL, not the VX or Grande. ‘Frills’ that include leather upholstery, a sunroof, air rear suspension and variable-rate dampers are out of place in the scrub. We’d take off the side steps and fit after-market suspension that would cost a little in ride quality, but would preserve the already limited belly clearance with a load on board. We’d slot either a Detroit Soft Locker or an ARB Air Locker into the back axle.

There’s space for a second battery under the Prado’s bonnet, to power a fridge and to back up the starting battery. There are also several winches and winch bars to choose from, if self-recovery ability is needed.

Don’t fit heavy auxiliary batteries and oversized winches to the front of any Prado. Body panels and chassis crack if too much weight is placed over the front end. Auxiliary batteries need to be lightweight AGM types – expensive – and winches should be adequate, but not over-sized. You can save seven kilograms of winch weight by using plasma rope rather than wire cable.



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