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UTES & CAB CHASSIS

MERCEDES-BENZ X-CLASS

The Nissan Navara-based M-B ute was released in April 2018

The X-Class was released in Australia in April 2018. The ‘Benz dual-cab ute is based on the Nissan Navara, using its chassis, axles, most body parts, four cylinder diesel powertrain and driveline.

 

At launch the X-Class was powered by Renault-Nissan common rail diesel 120kW and 140 kW engines. Manual six-speed and auto seven-speed boxes were available.

Changes to the Navara included sound deadening, revised coil spring suspension and damper settings, slightly wider front and rear track dimensions and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes.

Low-range gearing and rear diff lock were standard.

Also standard across the range was traction and stability control, Active Brake Assist (Autonomous Emergency Braking) and Lane Keeping Assist. 

There were plans to add a full-time-4WD version later in 2018, powered by the aluminium block and head, three-litre Mercedes-Benz V6 diesel.

Unlike the Navara range the X-Class wasn't offered with single and extra-cab bodies or heavy duty rear leaf springs.Three specification and equipment levels were available: Pure, Progressive and Power, and there were 13 variants.

A high-torque V6 diesel engine will be released from late-2018, with 190kW and 550Nm, in a full-time-4WD version.  This engine has been used in many Mercedes-Benz passenger car and van models – from the G-Class to the latest E-Class. Pricing will be announced closer to the release date.

The ‘Benz press kit for the X-Class launch claimed a payload of over one tonne and said that the cargo area can hold 17 full 50-litre barrels. We challenged them to load it like that and not exceed the rear axle load rating: it’s PR rubbish of course.

Like all other dual-cab utes the X-Class was flat out containing a half-tonne in its tray. 

Claimed trailer towing capacity was 3500kg, but the coil-sprung Navara struggled with heavy ball weights, so that needed qualification as well.

The X-Class Power came with a 360-degree camera and all ute models were equipped with a reversing camera. The 360-degree camera was optional on the Progressive range.

Optional on all models, the Plus Package included the Parktronic parking assistance system.

Pure standard equipment included a grained front bumper in black and black rear bumper; powered mirrors;17-inch steel wheels; vinyl flooring; 18cm display screen; manual six-speed transmission; rear differential lock and tyre pressure monitoring.

Progressive models picked up heated mirrors; rain-sensing wipers, Garmin navigation system; 17-inch aluminium wheels; bumpers in vehicle colour; carpet; leather steering wheel rim, handbrake lever and gear lever knob; eight speakers and adjustable load-securing rails.

Power models got leather-look seats; LED headlamps;18-inch aluminium wheels; Comand multimedia and navigation system; auto-dimming mirror with compass readout; 360-degree camera; power-adjustable front seats and climate control. 

Pricing four the four-cylinder diesel models started at $45,500 for the base 120kW manual cab/chassis and rose to $64,500 for the 140kW automatic

ute.

 

‘Benz V6 powertrain

The new X 350d 4Matic flagship X-Class model will arrive in Australia in December 2018 with the proved Mercedes-Benz 3.0-litre 190kW (258 hp)/550Nm V6 diesel engine, mated to a 7G-Tronic Plus seven-speed automatic transmission and permanent all-wheel drive.

Permanent all-wheel drive with low-range reduction and a differential lock on the rear axle ensures traction on a wide range of surfaces.

The all-wheel drive system is fitted with a central differential, which distributes the drive force between the front and rear axle at a torque distribution of 40:60 percent. This delivers an optimum level of traction in normal driving conditions, but he 4Matic permanent all-wheel drive system continuously adjusts the torque distribution to match the driving conditions.

When driving off-road 4H can be selected first. This distributes the drive force between the front and rear axle at a torque distribution of 30:70 percent, which is ideal for driving on rocky, sandy or snow covered terrain.

The 4L mode distributes the drive force between the front and rear axle at a torque distribution of 50:50 percent.

Dynamic Select gives the driver a choice of five driving modes, the driving characteristics can be changed by fingertip control, from relaxed and comfortable to sporty and dynamic. These modes modify the engine response, the automatic transmission's shift points, and the ECO start/stop function.

Standard equipment includes seven airbags, internally vented disc brakes on the front and rear and an attachment system for two child seats.

Lane Keeping Assist in the four-cylinder models is changed for the X 350d 4Matic to Active Lane Keeping Assist, meaning if a driver unintentionally departs from the lane not only will pulsed steering wheel vibrations occur, but one-sided braking is also applied to manoeuvre the vehicle back into its lane automatically.

Additionally there is ESP trailer stabilisation, a tyre pressure monitoring system, cruise control, a reversing camera and, in the Power model, a 360° camera.

The X 350 d 4Matic is available in Progressive and Power equipment levels. RRP at launch is expected to be $73,270 and $79,415, respectively.

 

On and off road  

Our July 2018 test vehicle was a top-shelf four-cylinder Power ute that we drove firstly empty and then with 250kg in the tray.With and without a load the X-Class was a cut above all other utes in this class: quieter and with car-like ride and handling.

The suspension was Euro-firm, but the X-Class never stepped out of line on rough surfaces and handled corrugations with ease. The spring rates and damper valving were very well matched and that’s unheard of in the ute market, where mismatched springs and shockers are the norm.

The X-Class was the only new ute we’ve tested that didn’t need a suspension upgrade.

The front and rear seats were the most comfortable and supportive chairs we’ve found in any ute. Even long-legged rear seat passengers had good under-thigh support.

Off-road the X-Class Power ute was nobbled by having optional side steps that reduced ground clearance, but excellent suspension travel allowed it to climb and descend rocky trails without much need for traction control intervention.

The 4WD and low range dial control, and the diff lock switch worked well and engagement and disengagement were rapid.

The twin-turbo engine had ample grunt for all on and off road conditions, cruised at 2100rpm at freeway speed and delivered overall economy of 8.5L/100km.

The Comand navigation system allowed map zooming from 20m to global scale, so it was quite useful for route planning; unlike other systems that don’t provide a real zoom function. However, it lacked mapping of some bush trails in our test area.

We loved the 360-degree camera that presented a split-screen image of the vehicle from above - drone-like - as well as clear-focus images of the ground in the front and rear of the vehicle. The camera was a boon when manoeuvring in tight situations, both on and off road.

The 2018 Mercedes-Benz X-Class Power model was easily the best ute we’ve tested in this class. The contrast with the company’s horrible military-grade G-Wagon Pro tray-back could hardly be more stark.

 


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