CAMPING GEAR

A BLOWN THONG CAN SPOIL YOUR TRIP

Some good quality thongs are easy to repair in the bush

We've busted thongs on bush trips and some types can’t be fixed. However, Crocs can and this is how you can do it.

We’ve been using authentic Croc thongs and slip-on closed-toe shoes for several years. We’ve tried many other brands, but Crocs have proved their durability and comfort many times over.

Croc thongs fit tightly and won’t accidentally slip off when you’re checking out the depth of a water crossing. They also have a cushion sole that makes walking much more comfortable.

However, arduous walking or a slip can strain the toe-strap attachment point and it is possible to tear out this vital connection. Fortunately, repair isn’t difficult.

The starting point is cleaning the frayed ends of the anchoring tabs, to get rid of any adhering rubber and dirt. Then it’s time to tease up the inlaid upper section of the moulded sole and to fill up the cavity with super glue or two-part adhesive liquid.

While lifting up the raised section of the sole, put the anchoring tabs back in place, being careful not to glue your fingers to the thong, and press the raised portion of the sole back into place. Easy.

If a test stroll shows that the glue isn’t likely to hold, you have fall-back in the form of your tent-canvas repair kit. A heavy-duty needle and thread can be used to run stitches through the thickness of the sole and through the anchoring tabs. 

The underside thread wraps will eventually wear through, but you’ll be home by then.

Most cheap thongs have a moulded rubber strap with a knob on the underside of the thong, to hold it in place. If you bust the knob off the strap there's not much you can do in the bush to fix it.

However, if the knob pulls through an enlarged or split hole in the sole, you may be able to effect a temorary repair by stitching up the hole (with the strap and knob already inserted through it) or by fitting a fat washer between the knob and the underside of the thong.




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